Welcoming Everything
"To find God, you must welcome everything," said Rabindranath Tagore. In Return to the Sacred, Jonathan H. Ellerby outlines 12 master paths that celebrate the benefits of steady, intentional spiritual practice. In Faith Styles, John R. Mabry presents six faith styles which speak to those of us who are "spiritually eclectic," honoring diversity, spiritual growth, the body, and the wisdom in our own experiences.

Searching for the Sacred
The search for the sacred is part of the human adventure, a melding of the personal and the planetary in the quest for meaning. Stephanie Dowrick's Seeking the Sacred lets us discover what is "most treasured and transformative in human existence." In God on Your Own, Joseph Dispenza shares his spiritual quest after leaving behind the traditions, rituals, and rules of Roman Catholicism.

Finding Your Own Prayer Path
Large numbers of people are leaving religious institutions to find their own spiritual path. How to Pray Without Being Religious by Janell Moon offers new sources of material for your devotional life. We like the one-line prayers: "There is everything here for me." "Spirit, in me, shine." "Together we belong." Read more of her prayers.

Maps May Not Apply
Those who follow established religious paths and those who are heading into uncharted territory may find that old forms of guidance don't necessarily fit. In his visionary book Roadsigns, Philip Goldberg helps us live at the heart of paradox by applying familiar travel phrases like "possible delays," "secure all baggage," and "use all available lanes" to spiritual life as we find it now.

A Spiritually Independent Agent of Change
In the feature film Patch Adams, we witness the true story of a Virginia medical student who breaks all the rules by daring to proclaim that the best medicine for patients is large doses of listening, love, laughter, and compassion. He is a fine model of a spiritually independent agent of change.

For Unchurched Gen Xers
In What Would I Believe If I Didn't Believe Anything?, a handbook for "Spiritual Orphans," Kent Ira Groff probes a new kind of passionate yet inclusive faith spiked with illustrative material from movies, poetry, music, and sports. He finds hope and meaning in pop culture and acts of everyday spirituality.

Out-of-the-Box Spirituality
In two books, Jan Phillips shares her creative and vibrant vision of spirituality. No Ordinary Time blends mysticism and consciousness raising in startling configurations. Finding the On Ramp to Your Spiritual Path is a savvy guide for seekers of all stripes which articulately describes what it means to follow your own path.

A Third Path Beyond Religion and Secularism
In Beyond Religion: Ethics for a Whole World, His Holiness the Dalai Lama lifts our spirits with his vision of spiritual seekers and others working together to promote the oneness of the human family. In this excerpt from the book, the common good trumps everything else.

Mapping the Spiritual Practice of Transformation
Living Deeply is a path-breaking work that presents a rounded inquiry into the art and science of transformation in over 35 years of consciousness research at the Institute of Noetic Sciences. Get set for some exciting takes on the life-altering aspects of regular spiritual practices.

Probing the Fresh Dimensions of the Word Spirituality
Christianity After Religion by Diana Butler Bass critiques institutional religion and offers a hopeful adventure "to find a new way of connecting with God." In this excerpt, she looks at the term "spirituality" and finds that it is now laden with emotional freight.

The Pitfalls That Come With Awakening
In The End of Your World, Adyashanti takes a hard look at enlightenment and sees in it as a shift in perception. Two of the pitfalls on his path involve getting stuck in a sense of superiority over others or getting trapped in transcendence. Both require us to see that enlightenment does not mean a life of peace and equanimity.

All Who Wander Are Not Lost
In this clip from footage shot for Transcendental Media's "Flight From Death: The Quest for Immortality," author and philosopher Sam Keen discusses his thoughts on the notion of "being lost."