Sign In  |  Register  |  Shopping Cart Shopping Cart  |  RSS Subscribe to RSS Feed  
Spirituality & Practice
Search This Site
Loading
Find Us On
Follow Me on Pinterest
DonateNow
Sign Up
Conscious Aging Alliance
Conscious Aging Alliance Events
Search Reviews
Title:

Director
First Name:

Director
Last Name:

Keywords:

Medium:
Practice:

Tradition:
About the Database

Search our database of more than 4,500 film reviews. We have been discovering spiritual meanings in movies for nearly four decades.

Film Review

By Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat

 

Tin Cup
Directed by Ron Shelton
Warner 08/96 DVD/VHS Feature Film
R

"There is a mystic in every one of us, yearning to play again in the universe," Matthew Fox has observed. In Tin Cup, Roy (Kevin Costner in an immensely appealing and relaxed performance) is a Texas golf ace who runs a seedy driving range and hangs out with a beer-guzzling group of middle-aged men who have seen better days. Although Roy has plenty of natural talent as a golfer, his love for spectacular and difficult shots has limited his competitive ability on the circuit.

His mystical and poetic appreciation of golf comes to the fore when Dr. Molly Griswold (Rene Russo), a therapist, shows up for a lesson. When he then learns that her lover is David Simms (Don Johnson), a college buddy who is now a self-satisfied golf pro, Roy's competitive instincts are aroused and he sets out to qualify for the U.S. Open. Along the way, he tests the patience and loyalty of his best friend and caddy (Cheech Marin) while trying to convince Molly that she is with the wrong man. Roy ends up competing in the U.S. Open and going for broke.

Tin Cup is one of the best films of 1996 with its message that in love and in sports, playing it safe can't hold a candle to taking risks and acting from the heart. This romantic comedy, written and directed by Ron Shelton (Bull Durham), vividly celebrates the delight and unadulterated joy of playing in the universe.

 

Films Now Showing
Recent VHS/DVD Releases

Reviews and database copyright 1970 2012
by Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat
  Email This Review
Share |
Film Awards
The Most Spiritually Literate Films of:
 
Sports 
Purchase from: