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Film Review

By Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat

 

French Postcards
Directed by Willard Huyck
Paramount Home Video 08/80 DVD/VHS Feature Film
PG

Love is like the measles; we all have to go through it.
            — Jerome Jerome

Joel, Alex, and Laura are three American college students spending their junior college year abroad at the Institute of French Studies in Paris. They arrive with different hopes for making the most of the experience. The socially awkward and introverted Joel is lured out of his room by Toni, a worldly wise French student who works at a nearby stationary store. She taps the hidden Lothario in him.

Alex wants to taste the pleasures of l'amour. The school's headmistress Madame Tessier gives him more than he bargains for. Ignored by her husband with whom she shares responsibilities for running the institute, she seduces Alex as a way of getting back at him.

Laura visits every tourist spot and cultural center in the city, writing about them later to her boyfriend back in the States. A trip to a medieval festival at Laon with an Iranian travel agent turns into a nightmare. Eventually she and the disillusioned Alex team up together.

French Postscards ambles along with an agreeable mix of comedy, pathos, and clever cross-cultural observations. Miles Chaplin registers well as the love-stricken Joel; Valerie Quennessen is sparkling as the French girl who charms him; and Marie-France Pisier as Madame Tessier is as alluring as usual.

 

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Reviews and database copyright 1970 2012
by Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat
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