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Hinduism, Buddhism, and... Money? By Vidushi Sharma in the KidSpirit Money and Value issue. Artwork by Amy Liu (This was originally posted on KidSpirit in June 2012) This June if you’d walked into the last KidSpirit Editori…
Being Tolerant of the Unsmiling Why we should be more tolerant of those who never smile. "Yogananda Paramahamsa has a beautiful suggestion for thawing the arctic state of our feelings; it is for all of us to become smile milliona…
Laughter in My Heart By Meenu Ravi for the KidSpirit Exploring Humor Issue Laughter is the world’s most common language. I can’t imagine life without laughter. It’s like cake without the yummy frosting. I t…
Smiling as Mouth Yoga How we marvel at the delightful smile of an infant; there's little we won't do to win another one! As we grow older the act of smiling changes into a complex nonverbal interchange; a smile is part o…
S&P Open House / Birthday Celebration The weekend of March 19 – 20, 2016 was quite a celebratory time for Spirituality & Practice. Patricia Carlson (Senior Editor/Program Director) and I (Creative Director) traveled from our respectiv…
Celebrating the Dalai Lama's Birthday July 6, 1915. His Holiness the Dalai Lama is 80 today. He is the political and spiritual leader of the Tibetan people, a Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and teacher of nonviolence, and a convener of mult…
The Joy of Old Age "At 80, one can take in the long view and have a vivid, lived sense of history not possible at an earlier age," writes Oliver Sacks, professor of neurology at the N.Y.U. School of Medicine and the a…
Light on the Path Song If changes are to come there are things that must be done And a song is somewhere to begin. — "Somewhere to Begin" by T. R. Ritchie, sung by Sara Thomsen Artistic Wisdom Flowers …
Happiness Through Service By Jung Woo Be for KidSpirit’s Happiness issue. There is a widespread view that happiness is obtained through reciprocity — in other words, that how much we receive in any given exchange dict…
Why Elders Smile When researchers asked people to rank their own well-being, those who rated themselves most highly were individuals from 82 to 85. This startling statistic comes from a column written by David Brook…